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Bullion Canyon

Bullion Canyon near Marysvale, Utah is home to the Canyon of Gold Tour, which takes visitors past several mining ruins including old mining houses and mining equipment.

Canyon of Gold Driving Tour

Start

Cross the veil of time and discover the secrets of a canyon riddled with gold and the saga of men who sought her riches.

Since the earliest days of human civilization, gold has enticed the souls of most mortal men.

Gold! Gold! Gold! Gold!
Bright and yellow, hard and cold
Molten, graven, hammered rolled,
Heavy to get and light to hold.
(Thomas Hood, 1799-1845)

The mouth of Utah's "Canyon of Gold" stretches before you. From at least 1865, flecks of gold in the creek and veins of gold inside her walls have drawn the hopeful to this canyon by the thousands.

For the next 1-2 hours, this brochure will introduce you to the life and times of the miners of Bullion Canyon. Numbers in this brochure correspond to numbered posts found along the next 2.5 miles of this road. The road is rough in spots but is passable by most two-wheel drive vehicles.

HELP PRESERVE OUR HERITAGE, DO NOT COLLECT ARTIFACTS OR DEFACE BUILDINGS.

At this point, set your odometer to "0". Stop 1 is 0.6 miles past the trailhead.

1. Toll Road

Successful mining companies required transportation systems that allowed supplies, industrial equipment and building materials to be brought in while providing access for its workers and routes to remove gold, silver and lead. Roads were the life-lines to Virginia, Bullion and Webster cities, the three earliest communities of the canyon.

Around 1869, D. C. Tate, a man named McCorkinlin and others built the first road into Bullion with $7,000 of their profits from the sale of the Morning Star Mine. A toll station was set up either at the mouth of Bullion Canyon or near the Marysvale Town spring (Stop 2). The road accessed the workings in the canyon including the Golden Curry Lode which had been in operation since 1868. To the dismay of the toll road operators, the local miners built a second road that was more direct and level than the pay road that climbed a steep ridge.

The second road closely follows the road we drive today while the remnants of the toll road are visible on the north side of the modem road. Climb the stairs, stand on the platform, and look right and left. Although overgrown and littered with rocks, the toll road is still clearly visible.

Without the heavy earth-moving equipment we take for granted today, road building during the 19th century was a slow, tedious and back-wrenching job.

Stop 2 is 0.85 miles past the trailhead.

2. Corral

In the late 1800's, the flat open area on the right side of the road (north) was occupied by corrals that probably stabled a small number of mules belonging to the Dalton Mill. Located about a mile up the road, the mill used mules to pull ore cars from mines still further up the canyon. Although the sleepers and rails have long since been removed, the bed of this ore car railroad can still be found along the north facing slopes of the canyon (Stop 7).

Life in the gold mines of Bullion Canyon was tough for man and beast alike. Mules were worked long and hard but they did enjoy corrals open to the sky and fresh spring. In the California gold country, many mules spent their entire lives underground in mines which were indescribably dark, cold and wet. In the early 1900's, mules were replaced with "motors" (locomotives) powered by batteries or Model T gasoline engines.

Because mules played such an important part in a successful mining operation, they were generally well-cared for. Over the mountain in the Kimberly Gold District, a well-liked mule was accidentally killed while underground. Distraught, the mule skinner refused to allow anyone to cut up the body of the animal which would have eased her removal from the mine.

Stop 3 is 1.5 miles past the trailhead

3. Witt Tate Mine

The log buildings on both sides of the road were built by a prospector named Witt Tate sometime around 1920. Tate constructed the cabin and out-buildings to support his mining operation in the rocky ledges on the north side of the canyon.

Witt sold the mine several times and in 1948, he sold the property to the Bullion Monarch. When the prospects failed to provide the new owners with enough capital to operate the mine, Tate foreclosed. This seems to be a pattern and many people now believe that Bullion Canyon produced more profits through speculation and the sale of worthless stocks than it did by the recovery of gold.

What had led the owners of the Bullion Monarch to suspect the presence of high grade ores was Tate's discovery of deposits of lead. Gold is almost always associated with lead and silver and this alloy or combination of metals is always found with quartz. Millions of years ago, hot volcanic magma and mineralized fluids pushed up through the layers of the earth. Pockets of gold, lead and silver were left behind with quartz in the sandstone of Bullion Canyon.

Witt Tate has been described as a successful miner.

Stop 4 is 1.75 miles past the trailhead

4. Dalton Mill and Boardinghouse

The clearing on the right side of the road (north) is where the main boardinghouse stood. Little remains of the log building except for a few scattered artifacts. The clientele of the boardinghouse were mostly single men who sought employment in the gold fields. Around 1920, the cost of staying in an accommodation like this could have been as high as $1.05 a day, with meals priced from 50¢ to $1.00. With wages ranging between $2.00 and $4.00 a day for laborers, muckers (shovelers), timbermen, carmen, and blacksmiths, most only made enough to provide the bare essentials.

On the opposite side of the road, to the south and across the creek, are the remains of the Dalton Mill, erected sometime around 1892. The only remains of the mill are concrete foundations, a large flat pile of tan-colored tailings and rusted equipment which can be seen through the trees. When in operation, the mill received ore from large, 3 ton cars pulled on rails by mules which entered the top of the building about 250 feet up the slope. In the winter ore was brought to the mill on bull hides. Fed by gravity, ore moved downhill where it was mechanically crushed and pulverized along the way. At the bottom of the plant, gold ore was concentrated and shipped to Great Britain and later to Salt Lake City, where a smelter would create bars of pure gold bullion. Mines using the mill included The Wedge, Bully Boy, and Dalton.

Stop 5 is 1.8 miles past the trailhead

5. Arrastra

From the traffic turnout, a narrow trail leads down the bank towards the stream. On the very edge of the creek and partially in the water is a large block of stone about 10 feet long. A circular depression 34 inches in diameter has been cut into the top of the stone.

According to local lore, the first American miners to enter Bullion Canyon in the 1860's found rotted sacks of gold ore across the creek from this boulder. Perhaps earlier miners had reduced highgrade ore on this device which is called an arrastra.

Arrastras were first introduced into the New World by the Spanish in the 1500's. To use a typical arrastra, ore was broken into walnut sized chunks with a sledge hammer and placed into the circular milling area. Three drag stones, chained to a post in the center of the milling area, were rotated by hand or mule. The drag stones crushed the ore into a fine powder and water was added until a thick slurry was produced.

Mercury (quicksilver) was then introduced to the mixture which removed and amalgamated any gold found in the ore.

Does the presence of this arrastra tell us that Spanish prospectors were in this canyon mining gold two or three hundred years ago? The answer is neither a simple yes or no because archaeologists have no way to "date" the arrastra.

If we turn to written history for a clue, we are told that the Spanish were insatiable in their quest for riches. During the 1600's and 1700's, this appetite had driven them to explore most of what was to become the southern half of the United States.

Because they had established a nearby stronghold in New Mexico (1598), it is possible that there were prospectors in Utah and maybe even in Bullion Canyon long before the first "official" expedition by the Spanish in 1776.

Stop 6 is 2.15 miles past the trailhead

6. Bullion City Limits

According to Piute County Court documents, Bullion City may have been initially established at the mouth of Bullion Canyon near the Forest Service boundary. At some point, Bullion City was moved up the canyon. This move may have coincided with the reorganization of the Ohio Mining District in 1872. At this stop, you can look across the bridge and creek to the site of the relocated camp. During its heyday, the camp had 40 to 50 buildings, numerous tents and even dugouts. The 1880 census shows the population of the town as 1,651 souls, but 10 years later this figure had declined to 259. In 1922, when the Bully Boy Mill (Stop 8) was built, what was left of Bullion City became a company town with a population in the hundreds.

Life in gold camps like Bullion City was hard. Health conditions were poor and often there was no medicine. Lodgings were primitive, most miners lived in tents or crude shelters with walls of canvas, hides or rough-hewn planks. Mining for gold required hard and monotonous labor. It was frequently necessary to work long hours while knee-deep in mud or icy water. Mine laborers generally worked 10 hour shifts, 6 days a week with Sundays off.

Mining camps could also be dangerous places. Consider this account from a nearby mining camp by Merrill Utley in The Ghosts of Gold Mountain (1992):

Two miners by the name of R. J. Gibson and J. Jacobs had been imbibing rather freely of the flowing bowl and got into a dispute over a gold claim ... They mutually agreed to retire to the street and settle their differences ... As they got into the street, they began pumping away at each other (with pistols) only a few feet apart. They missed!

Fire was another danger and could easily devastate a town made of wood and canvas. It is said that a fire storm raged up the dirt road by the bridge on the right side of the creek (north) destroying a number of shacks and cabins. Look across the bridge and up to the south slopes of the canyon. As you drive up the road beneath these slopes, look for islands of aspen surrounded by spruce and fir trees. The aspen trees, recognized by their light green leaves in summer, are what grew back after a 1923 fire that started at a mine.

Stop 7 is 2.2 miles past the trailhead.

7. Bullion City Meetinghouse

In front of you on the right side of the road (north) are the charred remains of a log cabin that served as Bullion City's meetinghouse.

In the spring of 1994, the building was found to have burned to the ground. Evidence found in the ashes suggest that the burning of the cabin was person-caused either by intention or carelessness.

PLEASE BE CAREFUL WITH FIRE; THE CONSEQUENCES CAN BE DEVASTATING.

Turn to your left and look across the road. Several stone walls can be seen extending into the trees. These foundations are said to have supported an ore bin belonging to the Deseret Mine. From the walls, continue to turn to your left until you are facing slightly downhill. Look closely and in the grass just above the road, you will see a graded surface that was the bed for the 3 ton ore cars pulled by mules on track. It carried gold ore from the mines in this area to the Dalton Mill. The sleepers and rails are gone, but the grade can be followed to the millsite (stop 4).

One of the cars that ran along this grade is on display at the Miners' Park (stop 9).

Stop 8 is 2.25 miles past the trailhead.

8. Bully Boy Mill

One of the most impressive reminders of the vitality and industry that once thrived in Bullion City is the Bully Boy Mill. Constructed in 1922, the mill received ore from the Bully Boy adits and The Wedge, Dalton, Great Western, Deseret, Cascade, Shamrock and Morning Star mines. The ruins of the mill measure over 238 feet long and 45 feet wide.

The mill was a technological wonder for its time. Ore came to the top of the mill where it was dumped to start the mill circuit.

As the ore moved downhill through the mill, it was mechanically ground into sand by crushers and stamps. Water was added to the crushed ore and the slurry mixture was moved to the "concentrators" where vibrating machines separated gold bearing ore from worthless rock scrap. The final step in milling ore involved passing the concentrated slurry mixture over large copper plates coated with mercury. Mercury was used because it attracts gold like a magnet attracts iron.

In 1938, the mill closed because the cost of producing an ounce of gold exceeded the market value of gold which had been set by the government at $35 an ounce. Now deregulated, gold has recently approached $1,000 an ounce.

Today the Bully Boy Mill is privately owned. Please respect private property.

Do not enter the mill. IT IS UNSAFE!

Stop 9 is 2.5 miles past the trailhead.

9. Miner's Park and Picnic Area

The Miners' Park, built by Forest Service volunteers, was the inspiration of Rell Fredericks, a local miner who has since passed on to higher prospects. His trail begins in front of the wooden mine car and continues to your right where it climbs into the trees. For 1/4 mile, the trail will take you to 16 displays of mining equipment, reconstructed workings and a refurbished cabin.

When you have completed the walk around the Miners' Park, you might want to picnic in the area across the road. All 3 of the units have tables and fire rings. Please pack out all that you bring in.

If you are in the mood for a scenic walk, a 2 mile round-trip trail begins at the bridge below the Bully Boy Mill. The trail will take you on the north side of the creek to an overlook above the Bullion Canyon water falls. These 60 foot falls are especially spectacular in the early summer when runoff swells the volume of the creek.

For those who enjoy touring by auto, tum right onto Forest Road 126 just below the Bully Boy Mill. This 10 mile journey will take you near the 11,500' summit of Mt. Brigham and down through Cottonwood Canyon to U.S. Highway 89 just south of Marysvale. Be assured, the scenery is breathtaking. The road to Cottonwood Canyon is generally free of snow from mid-July to mid-November. The road tends to be rough in spots and higher clearance vehicles are recommended.

PLEASE LEAVE THE BROCHURE IN THE TRAILBOX OR PAY $1.00 TO TAKE IT HOME.

Interactive Map

Download KML file to view in Google Earth.

Waypoints

Waypoint Latitude Longitude Description
Start -112.2922840563858 38.42301537038404 Cross the veil of time and discover the secrets of a canyon riddled with gold and the saga of men who sought her riches. Since the earliest days of human civilization, gold has enticed the souls of most mortal men. Gold! Gold! Gold! Gold! Bright and yellow, hard and cold Molten, graven, hammered rolled, Heavy to get and light to hold. (Thomas Hood, 1799-1845) The mouth of Utah's "Canyon of Gold" stretches before you. From at least 1865, flecks of gold in the creek and veins of gold inside her walls have drawn the hopeful to this canyon by the thousands. For the next 1-2 hours, this brochure will introduce you to the life and times of the miners of Bullion Canyon. Numbers in this brochure correspond to numbered posts found along the next 2.5 miles of this road. The road is rough in spots but is passable by most two-wheel drive vehicles. HELP PRESERVE OUR HERITAGE, DO NOT COLLECT ARTIFACTS OR DEFACE BUILDINGS. At this point, set your odometer to "0". Stop 1 is 0.6 miles past the trailhead.
1 - Toll Road -112.3011379077373 38.41787948675742 Successful mining companies required transportation systems that allowed supplies, industrial equipment and building materials to be brought in while providing access for its workers and routes to remove gold, silver and lead. Roads were the life-lines to Virginia, Bullion and Webster cities, the three earliest communities of the canyon. Around 1869, D. C. Tate, a man named McCorkinlin and others built the first road into Bullion with $7,000 of their profits from the sale of the Morning Star Mine. A toll station was set up either at the mouth of Bullion Canyon or near the Marysvale Town spring (Stop 2). The road accessed the workings in the canyon including the Golden Curry Lode which had been in operation since 1868. To the dismay of the toll road operators, the local miners built a second road that was more direct and level than the pay road that climbed a steep ridge. The second road closely follows the road we drive today while the remnants of the toll road are visible on the north side of the modem road. Climb the stairs, stand on the platform, and look right and left. Although overgrown and littered with rocks, the toll road is still clearly visible. Without the heavy earth-moving equipment we take for granted today, road building during the 19th century was a slow, tedious and back-wrenching job. Stop 2 is 0.85 miles past the trailhead.
2 - Corral -112.308490820955 38.41669486372443 In the late 1800's, the flat open area on the right side of the road (north) was occupied by corrals that probably stabled a small number of mules belonging to the Dalton Mill. Located about a mile up the road, the mill used mules to pull ore cars from mines still further up the canyon. Although the sleepers and rails have long since been removed, the bed of this ore car railroad can still be found along the north facing slopes of the canyon (Stop 7). Life in the gold mines of Bullion Canyon was tough for man and beast alike. Mules were worked long and hard but they did enjoy corrals open to the sky and fresh spring. In the California gold country, many mules spent their entire lives underground in mines which were indescribably dark, cold and wet. In the early 1900's, mules were replaced with "motors" (locomotives) powered by batteries or Model T gasoline engines. Because mules played such an important part in a successful mining operation, they were generally well-cared for. Over the mountain in the Kimberly Gold District, a well-liked mule was accidentally killed while underground. Distraught, the mule skinner refused to allow anyone to cut up the body of the animal which would have eased her removal from the mine. Stop 3 is 1.5 miles past the trailhead
3 - Witt Tate Mine -112.3174867937615 38.41804927109255 The log buildings on both sides of the road were built by a prospector named Witt Tate sometime around 1920. Tate constructed the cabin and out-buildings to support his mining operation in the rocky ledges on the north side of the canyon. Witt sold the mine several times and in 1948, he sold the property to the Bullion Monarch. When the prospects failed to provide the new owners with enough capital to operate the mine, Tate foreclosed. This seems to be a pattern and many people now believe that Bullion Canyon produced more profits through speculation and the sale of worthless stocks than it did by the recovery of gold. What had led the owners of the Bullion Monarch to suspect the presence of high grade ores was Tate's discovery of deposits of lead. Gold is almost always associated with lead and silver and this alloy or combination of metals is always found with quartz. Millions of years ago, hot volcanic magma and mineralized fluids pushed up through the layers of the earth. Pockets of gold, lead and silver were left behind with quartz in the sandstone of Bullion Canyon. Witt Tate has been described as a successful miner. Stop 4 is 1.75 miles past the trailhead
Cabin -112.3203670601863 38.41734617302031  
4 - Dalton Mill and Boardinghouse -112.321532743218 38.41714813169676 The clearing on the right side of the road (north) is where the main boardinghouse stood. Little remains of the log building except for a few scattered artifacts. The clientele of the boardinghouse were mostly single men who sought employment in the gold fields. Around 1920, the cost of staying in an accommodation like this could have been as high as $1.05 a day, with meals priced from 50¢ to $1.00. With wages ranging between $2.00 and $4.00 a day for laborers, muckers (shovelers), timbermen, carmen, and blacksmiths, most only made enough to provide the bare essentials. On the opposite side of the road, to the south and across the creek, are the remains of the Dalton Mill, erected sometime around 1892. The only remains of the mill are concrete foundations, a large flat pile of tan-colored tailings and rusted equipment which can be seen through the trees. When in operation, the mill received ore from large, 3 ton cars pulled on rails by mules which entered the top of the building about 250 feet up the slope. In the winter ore was brought to the mill on bull hides. Fed by gravity, ore moved downhill where it was mechanically crushed and pulverized along the way. At the bottom of the plant, gold ore was concentrated and shipped to Great Britain and later to Salt Lake City, where a smelter would create bars of pure gold bullion. Mines using the mill included The Wedge, Bully Boy, and Dalton. Stop 5 is 1.8 miles past the trailhead
5 - Arrastra -112.3223119710376 38.4170785943094 From the traffic turnout, a narrow trail leads down the bank towards the stream. On the very edge of the creek and partially in the water is a large block of stone about 10 feet long. A circular depression 34 inches in diameter has been cut into the top of the stone. According to local lore, the first American miners to enter Bullion Canyon in the 1860's found rotted sacks of gold ore across the creek from this boulder. Perhaps earlier miners had reduced highgrade ore on this device which is called an arrastra. Arrastras were first introduced into the New World by the Spanish in the 1500's. To use a typical arrastra, ore was broken into walnut sized chunks with a sledge hammer and placed into the circular milling area. Three drag stones, chained to a post in the center of the milling area, were rotated by hand or mule. The drag stones crushed the ore into a fine powder and water was added until a thick slurry was produced. Mercury (quicksilver) was then introduced to the mixture which removed and amalgamated any gold found in the ore. Does the presence of this arrastra tell us that Spanish prospectors were in this canyon mining gold two or three hundred years ago? The answer is neither a simple yes or no because archaeologists have no way to "date" the arrastra. If we turn to written history for a clue, we are told that the Spanish were insatiable in their quest for riches. During the 1600's and 1700's, this appetite had driven them to explore most of what was to become the southern half of the United States. Because they had established a nearby stronghold in New Mexico (1598), it is possible that there were prospectors in Utah and maybe even in Bullion Canyon long before the first "official" expedition by the Spanish in 1776. Stop 6 is 2.15 miles past the trailhead
6 - Bullion City Limits -112.3273253056705 38.41423842592177 According to Piute County Court documents, Bullion City may have been initially established at the mouth of Bullion Canyon near the Forest Service boundary. At some point, Bullion City was moved up the canyon. This move may have coincided with the reorganization of the Ohio Mining District in 1872. At this stop, you can look across the bridge and creek to the site of the relocated camp. During its heyday, the camp had 40 to 50 buildings, numerous tents and even dugouts. The 1880 census shows the population of the town as 1,651 souls, but 10 years later this figure had declined to 259. In 1922, when the Bully Boy Mill (Stop 8) was built, what was left of Bullion City became a company town with a population in the hundreds. Life in gold camps like Bullion City was hard. Health conditions were poor and often there was no medicine. Lodgings were primitive, most miners lived in tents or crude shelters with walls of canvas, hides or rough-hewn planks. Mining for gold required hard and monotonous labor. It was frequently necessary to work long hours while knee-deep in mud or icy water. Mine laborers generally worked 10 hour shifts, 6 days a week with Sundays off. Mining camps could also be dangerous places. Consider this account from a nearby mining camp by Merrill Utley in The Ghosts of Gold Mountain (1992): Two miners by the name of R. J. Gibson and J. Jacobs had been imbibing rather freely of the flowing bowl and got into a dispute over a gold claim ... They mutually agreed to retire to the street and settle their differences ... As they got into the street, they began pumping away at each other (with pistols) only a few feet apart. They missed! Fire was another danger and could easily devastate a town made of wood and canvas. It is said that a fire storm raged up the dirt road by the bridge on the right side of the creek (north) destroying a number of shacks and cabins. Look across the bridge and up to the south slopes of the canyon. As you drive up the road beneath these slopes, look for islands of aspen surrounded by spruce and fir trees. The aspen trees, recognized by their light green leaves in summer, are what grew back after a 1923 fire that started at a mine. Stop 7 is 2.2 miles past the trailhead.
Bridge -112.3273233134839 38.41414505832997  
Cabin -112.3267001028266 38.4145606184316  
Cabin -112.3264099673538 38.41456441837547  
7 - Bullion City Meetinghouse -112.327323706255 38.41361367152819 In front of you on the right side of the road (north) are the charred remains of a log cabin that served as Bullion City's meetinghouse. In the spring of 1994, the building was found to have burned to the ground. Evidence found in the ashes suggest that the burning of the cabin was person-caused either by intention or carelessness. PLEASE BE CAREFUL WITH FIRE; THE CONSEQUENCES CAN BE DEVASTATING. Turn to your left and look across the road. Several stone walls can be seen extending into the trees. These foundations are said to have supported an ore bin belonging to the Deseret Mine. From the walls, continue to turn to your left until you are facing slightly downhill. Look closely and in the grass just above the road, you will see a graded surface that was the bed for the 3 ton ore cars pulled by mules on track. It carried gold ore from the mines in this area to the Dalton Mill. The sleepers and rails are gone, but the grade can be followed to the millsite (stop 4). One of the cars that ran along this grade is on display at the Miners' Park (stop 9). Stop 8 is 2.25 miles past the trailhead.
Webster City -112.3274339735797 38.41321302158737  
8 - Bully Boy Mill -112.3288149679852 38.41234318198731 One of the most impressive reminders of the vitality and industry that once thrived in Bullion City is the Bully Boy Mill. Constructed in 1922, the mill received ore from the Bully Boy adits and The Wedge, Dalton, Great Western, Deseret, Cascade, Shamrock and Morning Star mines. The ruins of the mill measure over 238 feet long and 45 feet wide. The mill was a technological wonder for its time. Ore came to the top of the mill where it was dumped to start the mill circuit. As the ore moved downhill through the mill, it was mechanically ground into sand by crushers and stamps. Water was added to the crushed ore and the slurry mixture was moved to the "concentrators" where vibrating machines separated gold bearing ore from worthless rock scrap. The final step in milling ore involved passing the concentrated slurry mixture over large copper plates coated with mercury. Mercury was used because it attracts gold like a magnet attracts iron. In 1938, the mill closed because the cost of producing an ounce of gold exceeded the market value of gold which had been set by the government at $35 an ounce. Now deregulated, gold has recently approached $1,000 an ounce. Today the Bully Boy Mill is privately owned. Please respect private property. Do not enter the mill. IT IS UNSAFE! Stop 9 is 2.5 miles past the trailhead.
Bully Boy Mill Silo -112.3283666600914 38.41243169512159  
Bully Boy Stamp Mill -112.3284030596784 38.41191451484221  
Cabin -112.331141301193 38.41155559527783  
Cabin -112.3314850974137 38.41141202335508  
Cabin -112.3316285264278 38.41135126541705  
9 - Miner's Park and Picnic Area -112.3318828807458 38.41116968358631 The Miners' Park, built by Forest Service volunteers, was the inspiration of Rell Fredericks, a local miner who has since passed on to higher prospects. His trail begins in front of the wooden mine car and continues to your right where it climbs into the trees. For 1/4 mile, the trail will take you to 16 displays of mining equipment, reconstructed workings and a refurbished cabin. When you have completed the walk around the Miners' Park, you might want to picnic in the area across the road. All 3 of the units have tables and fire rings. Please pack out all that you bring in. If you are in the mood for a scenic walk, a 2 mile round-trip trail begins at the bridge below the Bully Boy Mill. The trail will take you on the north side of the creek to an overlook above the Bullion Canyon water falls. These 60 foot falls are especially spectacular in the early summer when runoff swells the volume of the creek. For those who enjoy touring by auto, tum right onto Forest Road 126 just below the Bully Boy Mill. This 10 mile journey will take you near the 11,500' summit of Mt. Brigham and down through Cottonwood Canyon to U.S. Highway 89 just south of Marysvale. Be assured, the scenery is breathtaking. The road to Cottonwood Canyon is generally free of snow from mid-July to mid-November. The road tends to be rough in spots and higher clearance vehicles are recommended. PLEASE LEAVE THE BROCHURE IN THE TRAILBOX OR PAY $1.00 TO TAKE IT HOME.
Cabin -112.3351433635558 38.4101972812137  
Cabin -112.3340973958866 38.41106633353137  

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Trip Report: July 1, 2008

2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah
2008 White Family Reunion at Big Rock Candy Mountain, Utah

Trip Report: February 12, 2011

bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town
bullion canyon creek ghost town

Trip Report: June 9, 2012

Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon
Bullion Canyon

Trip Report: November 23, 2013

I took my 11-year-old Scouts up to Bullion Canyon for our November activity. It snowed about half an inch in Richfield, but we didn't think much of it until we got up the canyon where the snow was over a foot deep. The boys had fun playing in the snow. We looked at all the cool buildings. We shoe-sledded behind the truck on the way home.